Flexible Working
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Understand your legal rights regarding flexible working

To make a statutory request to your employer for flexible working, you must have been employed continuously for at least 26 weeks. Certain categories of employees are excluded from making such requests (e.g. members of the armed forces).

Your legal rights as an employee mean that you can only make one statutory request within any 12 month period and it must be made in writing. Your employer then has a duty to consider your request seriously and to deal with the whole process, including any appeals, within a three month period.

It is important to note that if an employer offers flexible working to some employees, that does not mean that they are obliged to offer it to everyone.

Many businesses will have a policy on flexible working, so it is helpful to get a copy of this and understand it fully before you make your request.

If your working hours change as a result of flexible working, then you should not be given worse terms and conditions, such as reduced pay or holiday allowance. This could be regarded as unfair discrimination by your employer. Working flexibly will also not affect your employment rights under the law, including your right to statutory redundancy pay and protection against unfair dismissal.

Your employer is still responsible for you whilst you are flexible working, be it at home or otherwise. Risk assessments should be carried out as normal for example on display screen equipment (DSE), and other provisions for accident reporting, first aid, training, etc will still apply.

Case Studies

Read fascinating stories of businesses in Cornwall & the Isles of Scilly who benefit from flexible working and teleworking.

Read the Case Studies?